3D Printed Heat Exchanger Has Venture Capitalists Wanting More

Posted by on Jul 27, 2015 in 3D Printing, Manufacturing, Metal 3D Printing

3D Printed Heat Exchanger Has Venture Capitalists Wanting More

Fuller’s gizmo is a heat exchanger – a device that is found in fridges, air-conditioners, power stations and, in this case, cars – and a product of 3D printing. Its internal geometry is so complex it can’t be made any other way. It’s half the weight of similar devices, significantly more efficient – and already has Silicon Valley venture capitalists keen to know more. Why? Because the heat exchanger industry will be reportedly worth $20 billion within the next five years. READ MORE I’m very excited to see how Additive Manufacturing can improve heat exchanger performance. It will enable complex designs that would be impossible to braze, either to fit into odd shaped spaces, to enhance the heat transfer coefficient, or to reduce the pressure drop by smoothing flow transitions and entry effects. Designs could also easily be customized or tailored to the air flow to increase performance in high-flow regions or save weight in dead air spots. I would also be very interested in seeing how printed surface treatments could be applied to internal, irregular...

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3D Printing Firms Stratysys vs HP – Which 3D Printing Stock is the Long Term Stock Buy?

Posted by on May 11, 2014 in 3D Printing, Investing, Manufacturing

3D Printing Firms Stratysys vs HP – Which 3D Printing Stock is the Long Term Stock Buy?

Strategic moves Its new releases like the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer have not only strengthened its product line, but also hopes and expectation in the Multi-Material 3D Printing business that will fetch comprehensively better results for the company in the coming quarters. Stratasys, hence, expects the printer’s triple jet technology, which allows users to combine color with a virtually unlimited combination of rigidity, flexibility, and transparency, to attract more users. In addition, the company is coming up with new apps for the MakerBot replicator platform with unmatched speed, reliability, quality, and connectivity that will certainly increase its market share in the 3D printing business. Moreover, its technology is very user friendly and easy-to-use, and offers reliable desktop 3D printing platforms with its new apps and focuses to cover the full range of consumer, prosumer, and professional users. Additionally to supplement growth in its product line, it has recently announced new PolyJet material for the Connex platforms, including Digital ABS2, which creates realistic, precise prototypes that are heat-resistant. The company anticipates better results from its new Connex3 Color 3D Printer that is combined with the three new color-enabling materials. Moreover, its strategy to expand its business overseas in regions such as Singapore, Japan, and China looks lucrative. Also, Stratasys is looking for a solid start with its recently established and fully-owned subsidiary in Korea. In addition, Stratasys has also entered into a distribution agreement with Dell to provide MakerBot Replicator 3D printers bundled with Dell Precision Workstations for small and medium-sized businesses. This will definitely enhance the reach of Stratasys’ printers going forward. Further, it’s very interesting to notice that Stratasys is seeing growth opportunities in the dental and medical fields as well, and to tap that market, it has announced the Objet Eden 260V Dental Advantage 3D printer and VeroGlaze dental material for Objet Eden V and OrthoDesk printers. Overall, the company has performed significantly well and I think it will continue to perform well on the back of strategic investments in R&D investments, expansion plans, and entry into new market segments. HP’s move But, investors must keep an eye on HP’s move into the 3D printing market as it sees strong growth opportunity here. Also, HP’s management is of the opinion that worldwide sales of 3D printers and related software and services will grow at a terrific pace to hit $11 billion by 2021. This will be a solid jump from just $2.2 billion two years ago. Also, according to Reuters, HP CEO Meg Whitman believes that “HP’s in-house researchers have resolved limitations involved with the quality of substrates used in the process, which affects the durability of finished products.” Therefore, Stratasys has to accelerate its business and ensure that its 3D printing offerings are cutting...

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Carl Bass of Autodesk Talks About 3D Printing on CNBC

Posted by on Mar 31, 2014 in 3D Printing, Manufacturing

Carl Bass of Autodesk Talks About 3D Printing on CNBC

Carl Bass is President and Chief Executive Officer of Autodesk, the leader in 3D design, engineering, and entertainment software. In the 3d printing video he talks about manufacturing, bioprinting, and 3d printing stocks. Carl Bass, President and Chief Executive Officer of Autodesk, a leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software, will deliver the keynote, The Future of Manufacturing: 3D Printing and Beyond, the morning of April 4 at the 3D Printing Conference in New...

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Cloud Manufacturing – 3D Printing Tipping Point With HP Introducing Its Own 3D Printer in 2014

Posted by on Dec 11, 2013 in 3D Printing, Manufacturing

Cloud Manufacturing – 3D Printing Tipping Point With HP Introducing Its Own 3D Printer in 2014

We see a future where 3D printing allows the phrase “cloud manufacturing” to become commonplace, where complex metals and textiles are printed as easily as plastics or ceramics, where 3D printers sit alongside traditional machining methods in a symbiotic relationship, and where consumers can simply scan 3D images on their phones and print them at home or online (imagine the selfie market alone!). The good news is that this future appears close. Read full article: 3D Systems: Pac Crest Starts at Buy; Here Comes ‘Cloud Manufacturing’. After two decades of slow adoption and evolution, we are now reaching a tipping point in 3D printing, a point where Meg Whitman of HP wants to capture a piece of the growth (HP plans to introduce its own 3D printer in 2014), a point where GE bought the largest service provider of metal printing (Morris Technologies) to speed technology advancement and adoption, and a point where, at last check, there are at least 30 Kickstarter campaigns for new 3D printers, software, materials, or...

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Future Manufacturing

Posted by on Feb 24, 2013 in Manufacturing, Slideshow

Future Manufacturing

Compressed timelines from design to finished product accelerates adoption of new consumer products. There will be less “big manufactured” goods. Specialty manufacturing will take some of that industry away. There will be less manufacturing jobs. If audiologists can print on site and on demand, what happens to the people in the hearing aid factory? Less shipping. Instead of placing the washer in the envelope and sending it, I (or my local hardware store) can print it when I need it. Companies will keep lower inventory levels. The big, big, big, big MBA term is “supply chain disruption.” OK. That’s a fancy-schmancy way of saying “I don’t have to stock the washers for a 1956 Porsche.” Rapid prototyping. This term was used before. However, with the technology being more affordable, it means rapid sample orders as well. Firms can still place the order for 1 million washers to be produced in China. But I can get 1,000 washers to my biggest customer right away. Visit How to 3D Print...

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Mass Customization

Posted by on Feb 23, 2013 in Manufacturing

The 21st century’s industrial revolution is all about high volume manufacturing for customized orders.. With eyewear, traditional manufacturing processes have dictated that companies must make thousands of the exact same frames at once, regardless of whether those frames are particularly well-suited to any one person’s face. By using 3D printing, manufactures can turn that process on its head, which is why it’s worth paying attention to. Visit Custom 3D Printed...

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