3D Printing Stocks – And What Is Happening With 3D Printing Firm Organovo?

Posted by on Aug 6, 2015 in Biotech, Business

3D Printing Stocks – And What Is Happening With 3D Printing Firm Organovo?

The recent slide over the last few weeks has been spawned from the company’s latest secondary offering in which they raised an additional $40 million at a $4.25 share price. This struck a nerve with investors and provided yet another opportunity to rake in the profits. While the market didn’t love this news, in my opinion, as well as that of the company, this was a move to insure that Organovo remains a market leader within the bioprinting space. With around $90 million in cash on hand and no debt, Organovo now has a balance sheet which would make any biotech company envious. While analysts don’t expect the company to realize a profit until sometime in 2019, the magnitude of what Organovo is trying to do certainly makes their market cap of $345 million seem appealing, especially when the company recently estimated their current planned areas of research could lead to $400+ in annual revenue in the long run. Nothing is a certainly, especially in the bioprinting industry, much less the 3D printed biotech industry, but Organovo has a significant lead on the competition and has built a strong foundation for future success with partnerships with companies like L’Oréal and Merck. Any hint at a wildly successful product, either through these partnerships or their own R&D, could lead to a $1 billion+ buyout offer in the long run even if the company is not yet...

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3D Printing Industry Investments Ripe For Investors

Posted by on Jul 13, 2015 in Business, Investing, Startups

3D Printing Industry Investments Ripe For Investors

3D Printing Industry Set to Explode: 3 Promising Picks The 3D Printing industry seems to be on the brink of major transformation, with expanding end markets, influx of players and burgeoning applications for the technology. We believe that as 3D printing begins to permeate across more sectors, the time is ripe for investors to enter the arena and ride the impending wave of growth. READ FULL ARTICLE     “Digital Cobbler” Feetz Walks Off With $1.3 Million for 3-D Printed Shoes Feetz Inc., a Tennessee-based startup that calls itself a “digital cobbler,” as it makes custom footwear with 3-D printers, has raised $1.25 million in seed funding to begin offering its goods to consumers, the company said. READ FULL ARTICLE     Metal 3D Printing Startup MatterFab Raises $5.75 Million From GE Ventures MatterFab wants to change the way metal 3D printing is done by making the process more scalable and affordable. It’s raised $5.75 million in funding to continue to refine its 3D printing technology and get its printers onto the production lines of industrial manufacturers. GE is an interesting investor, considering the manufacturer’s decision to adopt 3D printing for some custom parts was part of the inspiration for MatterFab’s founding. READ FULL...

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3D Printing Financial News – Makerbot Layoffs and What it Means for the 3D Printing Industry

Posted by on May 7, 2015 in Business

3D Printing Financial News – Makerbot Layoffs and What it Means for the 3D Printing Industry

“It’s consolidating with Stratasys, so it’s economies of scale and looking at duplicate positions and consolidating,” the employee said. “We have a new CEO, so he has a different plan in mind,” she said, crying. “I’m sorry, it’s a hard day.” MakerBot was founded in 2009 by Bre Pettis and quickly rose to prominence as one of the few companies pushing 3D printing to market. The company bought by Stratasys for $403 million in 2013, and Pettis left as CEO to lead an “innovation workshop” at Stratasys. His successor, Jenny Lawton, has moved over to Stratasys this year. That’s when Jaglom took over. He is the first MakerBot CEO to come from Stratasys. ​ ​UPDATE: MakerBot has published an official statement that confirmed the layoffs, as well as announced the closing of all three of the company’s retail stores. Here is an excerpt from the post, which can be read in full on the firm’s website. ​ ​”Today, we at MakerBot are re-organizing our business in order to focus on what matters most to our customers. As part of this, we have implemented expense reductions, downsized our staff and closed our three MakerBot retail locations. With these changes, we will focus our efforts on improving and iterating our products, growing our 3D ecosystem, shifting our retail focus to our national partners and expanding our efforts in the professional and education markets.” The question of course….is this an omen of things to come? Or is it a correction whose time has come?  Many of the smaller firms could really benefit from some 3D Printing education as a means of staying alive....

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Revisiting 3D Printing Investment

Posted by on Apr 27, 2015 in 3D Printing, Business, Investing

Revisiting 3D Printing Investment

Back in 2013, 3D printing technology created a ton of buzz for the potential impact it could have on our daily lives and future capabilities in a number of industries. As a result, 3D printing stocks shot up, giving a taste of the glory days of emerging technology in the 90’s and 2000’s. This trend didn’t continue into 2014, though, stocks dove as the barrier for entry into the 3D printing business was too high for most people. Fast-forward to today, and you have most leaders of 3D printing business down over two-thirds from then. A New Hope? Now that all the sci-fi dreaming and initial uncertainty about what 3D printing could accomplish has been replaced with real-world progress and increased accessibility, 3D printing companies are able to paint a clearer picture of what types of solutions they can achieve in the near future. We are now seeing the world’s largest industries of medical, energy, agriculture, and defense use this technology on much grander scale. 3D printed tissues and organs are now a reality, custom-fitted medical devices, custom-made engine parts, custom-made replacement parts for large equipment; these are all major resource-saving solutions to businesses involved in 3D printing ventures. According to analytical firm Canalys, the 3D printing market will grow to $16.2 billion by 2018. IDC expects worldwide 3D printer unit sales and installed base to grow at a combined compound annual growth rate of 59% through 2017. These are certainly numbers that would make anyone interested in 3D printing stocks. That’s why 2015 is being pegged as the year of 3D printing investment. The next step in 3D printing investment prospects is getting a piece of the pie by means of acquiring smaller 3D printing companies that can bring big returns for little investment capital. Will 3D Printing Ventures Reinvigorate Interest? If you haven’t been paying attention to the 3D printing industry lately, some multi-national corporations have been throwing huge sums of cash into the pot. Folks like General Electric and Hewlett Packard are really starting to throw their weight around. GE, for example is already expanding their production to include a $32 million dollar 3D printing facility in Pittsburgh, PA. This isn’t just a test plant, either, it will set the precedent for all major competitors in their related industries, like Philips, Sony, Black and Decker, and so-on. Hewlett Packard is reviving their own 3D printing investments by introducing their own 3D printing technology called Multi-Jet Fusion. As you might gather from the name, Hewlett Packard is speeding things up by reducing the price point of 3D printers and increasing the print speed by a factor of 10 times the competitors on the market. This prospect will be huge for grabbing more attention from the average consumer, as we all know, it is much more visually impressive to witness something being printed before your own eyes. For...

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3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2015 in 3D Printers, Business, Education

3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Besides getting ahold of the best selling book; How to 3D Print Money (downloadable or on Amazon) Create and sell designs. This is the most affordable and easiest way to get started. It’s essentially like creating a smartphone app and selling it for royalties. * Start by learning from free CAD tools like Trimble Sketchup or TinkerCAD. Most beginners are surprised by how easily they can whip up a complex looking design after a few tutorials. Sophisticated and professional quality designs can be made with these tools. Make sure to leverage the available online tutorials and communities for help. Invent a design. * Leverage the power of 3D printing by creating complex shapes easily, customize designs cheaply, or create moving parts which require no assembly. Need inspiration? Spend time perusing the 40,000+ designs on thingiverse.com to marvel at the creativity and possibilities shared by others. * Once your design is complete in CAD, make sure it’s 3D printable (or “watertight,” in industry jargon). Other free tools like netfabb or the Solid Inspector plugin for Sketchup will find and correct errors you inadvertently created. * Now with your ready-to-print file, you just need to find an outlet to sell it. Sites like CG Trader are pure design marketplaces which allow users to search for 3D printable designs and print them on their own 3D printers. Other sites like Shapeways or i.Materialise allow similar services. Buy a 3D printer and offer a 3D printing service. While the concept is simple, this option is not quite as easy. It will require an investment of hundreds to thousands of dollars to acquire a printer. * The first step is to select a printer that has the right balance of cost, output quality, versatility, and ease of use. * Once you have the printer in your home or office you will need to spend ample time experimenting with it and mastering its intricacies. You will need to understand how variables like layer height, extrusion temperature, and travel speed will impact your print job. You will need to know how to select appropriate feedstock and optimize it based on the material type. Even the software you choose to turn the printable file into machine code (G-code in industry jargon) can influence the output. Many printers come with their own software to do this, but you may get different (perhaps better, in some cases) results with the open source replicator G, for instance. This in itself can be a fun path of discovery. * Once you are confident in your expertise you can enter the fray by offering your services as part of one of the emerging 3D printing networks. These are turnkey solutions with support for invoicing and shipping that allow you to list your printer and accept orders from people with designs they want printed. Currently, the largest such network is 3D Hubs. Come...

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3D Printing Venture Capital News and Trends

Posted by on Jan 22, 2015 in 3D Printing, Business

3D Printing Venture Capital News and Trends

Venture Capitalist 3D Prints a Rocket Faster Than the Speed of Sound for Under $2 Jurvetson is one of the most successful venture capitalists in Silicon Valley and an avid rocket maker who regularly travels to Nevada’s Black Rock Desert to launch his latest vehicles. READ MORE Pey is 3D-printing Bitcoin terminals and giving them away for free In Hanover, Germany, a new company is using Bitcoin to get electronic payments accepted by local merchants. So he gathered a few local technologists, developers, and industrial designers to create a 3D-printed Bitcoin point of sale that doesn’t cost a thing to use. READ MORE VCs Warm Up to 3D Printing After a dismal 2012, VCs plowed 300% more funding into 3D printing companies in the last 12 months. Crowdfunding a la Kickstarter has also has become a popular source of funding for 3D printing startups. READ MORE 3D Printing Live Online Panel: Overview and Trends Live online discussion with investors, entrepreneurs, and industry analysts. Post your questions before or during the evnt, which will be live streamed via Google Hangouts on...

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