3D Printing Funding Ventures – Israeli Firm Receives $25 Million

Posted by on May 9, 2017 in 3D Printers, Financing

3D Printing Funding Ventures – Israeli Firm Receives $25 Million

XJet is an Israeli 3D printing company that places an emphasis on metal 3D printing and is also the 4th most funded 3D printing company in 2016 (Formlabs was 3rd). To date they have raised $25 million through one round of venture funding. The Company boasts the “world’s first direct 3D metal jetting system,” driven by their innovative NanoParticle Jetting technology. While most metal 3D printers require that the operator handle metal powders which can be dangerous, the XJet system delivers the required metal nanoparticles in sealed cartridges, which are then easily loaded into the XJet system. In that way, the XJet system isn’t much more difficult to use than your standard desktop inkjet printer. The system allows for complete design freedom with no geometric limitations. NPJ is entirely unique from other metal printing technologies both in terms of process and output. XJet claims unprecedented layer thicknesses of 2 microns, unheard of in metal 3D printing, and printing speeds five times faster than laser sintering techniques. The speed of the process is further enhanced by the lack of post-processing required. The company also recently announced that their printers were capable of 3D printing ceramic objects, and said that they are targeting ceramic 3D printing for dental, medical and some industrial applications. According to the 3D Printing Trade Association “Xjet is typical of the types of deals that are being funded now. Superior technology that the market can quickly...

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Carbon3D is the 3D Printing Company Changing the Design and Manufacturing Industry

Posted by on Jan 28, 2017 in 3D Printers, 3D Printing, Business, Technology

Carbon3D is the 3D Printing Company Changing the Design and Manufacturing Industry

THE M1 IS A POWERFUL NEW TOOL FOR DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING. For the first time, it’s possible to 3D print isotropic parts with mechanical properties and surface finish like injection-molded plastics. No other additive technology delivers the synthesis of fit, form, and function needed to bridge the gap between prototyping and manufacturing. About Carbon Carbon works at the intersection of hardware, software, and molecular science. Our vision is a future fabricated with light, where traceable, final-quality parts are produced at scale with CLIP technology. CLIP — Continuous Liquid Interface Production — makes this vision possible by combining engineering­-grade materials with exceptional resolution and surface finish. Google Ventures: Carbon...

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Investing in 3D Printing Technology – Market Leaders and Big Brands Crowding the Growing 3D Printing Field

Posted by on Oct 18, 2016 in 3D Printers, 3D Printing, Investing

Investing in 3D Printing Technology – Market Leaders and Big Brands Crowding the Growing 3D Printing Field

“…market leaders 3D Systems (DDD) and Stratasys (SSYS) ran into operational challenges as the real-world demand failed to live up to the initial hype of a 3D print revolution.” “HP made its long-awaited entry into the 3D printer market five months ago, with partners that include Nike (NKE), Autodesk (ADSK), Proto Labs (PRLB) and BMW. HP announced two industrial 3D printers, with plans to begin shipping product later this year.” “General Electric, which had already invested about $1.5 billion since 2010 in what it calls additive manufacturing technology…” READ...

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3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2015 in 3D Printers, Business, Education

3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Besides getting ahold of the best selling book; How to 3D Print Money (downloadable or on Amazon) Create and sell designs. This is the most affordable and easiest way to get started. It’s essentially like creating a smartphone app and selling it for royalties. * Start by learning from free CAD tools like Trimble Sketchup or TinkerCAD. Most beginners are surprised by how easily they can whip up a complex looking design after a few tutorials. Sophisticated and professional quality designs can be made with these tools. Make sure to leverage the available online tutorials and communities for help. Invent a design. * Leverage the power of 3D printing by creating complex shapes easily, customize designs cheaply, or create moving parts which require no assembly. Need inspiration? Spend time perusing the 40,000+ designs on thingiverse.com to marvel at the creativity and possibilities shared by others. * Once your design is complete in CAD, make sure it’s 3D printable (or “watertight,” in industry jargon). Other free tools like netfabb or the Solid Inspector plugin for Sketchup will find and correct errors you inadvertently created. * Now with your ready-to-print file, you just need to find an outlet to sell it. Sites like CG Trader are pure design marketplaces which allow users to search for 3D printable designs and print them on their own 3D printers. Other sites like Shapeways or i.Materialise allow similar services. Buy a 3D printer and offer a 3D printing service. While the concept is simple, this option is not quite as easy. It will require an investment of hundreds to thousands of dollars to acquire a printer. * The first step is to select a printer that has the right balance of cost, output quality, versatility, and ease of use. * Once you have the printer in your home or office you will need to spend ample time experimenting with it and mastering its intricacies. You will need to understand how variables like layer height, extrusion temperature, and travel speed will impact your print job. You will need to know how to select appropriate feedstock and optimize it based on the material type. Even the software you choose to turn the printable file into machine code (G-code in industry jargon) can influence the output. Many printers come with their own software to do this, but you may get different (perhaps better, in some cases) results with the open source replicator G, for instance. This in itself can be a fun path of discovery. * Once you are confident in your expertise you can enter the fray by offering your services as part of one of the emerging 3D printing networks. These are turnkey solutions with support for invoicing and shipping that allow you to list your printer and accept orders from people with designs they want printed. Currently, the largest such network is 3D Hubs. Come...

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3D Printing Business – How Will 3D Printing Benefit Business and Where is 3D Printing Going?

Posted by on Apr 2, 2014 in 3D Printers

3D Printing Business – How Will 3D Printing Benefit Business and Where is 3D Printing Going?

Big businesses benefit as well, of course, from the improved efficiency of being able to print physical objects in complex shapes that would be considerably more expensive using traditional techniques. “Because you can make things that were previously impossible — ducts for wiring and cables, for example — that makes engineering much more efficient,” Shapeways’ Weijmarhausen says. He points to the example of aircraft manufacturers such as Airbus, which has capitalized on the technology to make stronger, stiffer and cheaper parts for its aircraft. As the efficiency of these techniques evolves, so does the bottom line for companies and consumers. Industry leaders see a future in which 3D printers become even more affordable, to the point where they will be accessible to anyone. “Mainstream adoption, like in homes, is where everybody believes we will get to,” Solidscape’s Esposito says. “Nobody knows when or how quickly it will be adopted but there are so many ways the technology will be used.” The next big development in the 3D printing world being adoption of the machines in schools rather than homes. MakerBot has developed some curricula for teachers to integrate the technology in the classroom, to familiarize the next generation with the process. “Imagine you’re 10 or 11 and have a machine that can make you anything; how does that change the scope of innovation in the U.S.?””It’s a great time to be alive, a great time to be somebody who’s...

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3D Printing Stocks Plunge – Will 3D Printing be Dominated by HP?

Posted by on Mar 23, 2014 in 3D Printers, 3D Printing

3D Printing Stocks Plunge – Will 3D Printing be Dominated by HP?

For the better part of two years, the 3D printing stocks of 3D Systems (DDD), Stratasys (SSYS), and ExOne (XONE) saw unabated growth and soaring stock prices. The market wasn’t paying attention to reality or accepting any potential threats or risks. Remember that in a normal market, a stock or sector of stocks that rise significantly typically attracts competitors and larger entrants from similar sectors. To an extent, too much success can create the ultimate downfall, as competition leads to lower margins. At the same time, fast growth and substantial profits will also drive in other entrants even if somewhat based on perception more than reality. Just this week, the sector finally got confirmation that one of the biggest threats is going to come to fruition. Printing technology leader, Hewlett Hewlett-Packard Co. (HPQ) confirmed intentions to unveil revolutionary 3D products by June. The move was long speculated as a threat to the industry, but investors pushing the sector stocks up to absurd valuation multiples mostly ignored this certain risk. With leader 3D Systems plunging some 40% since peaking at the start of the year, investors are faced with the reality that significant competition will begin in 2014. Long-term, new entrants will grow the size of the pie for the sector, but it doesn’t mean that 3D Systems or Stratasys will see higher stock prices anytime soon. Investors need to look no further than the natural gas shale boom and Chesapeake Energy (CHK) too see what happens to the leading stock when sector growth attracts more investments. The concern for investors going forward is the limited research and development, or R&D, budgets of the sector leaders and the massive size of Hewlett-Packard. These limited budgets combined with industry growth that might not exceed 20% places these stocks in precarious positions after rampant stock gains in the last couple of...

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