Short Selling in 3D Printing Stocks?

Posted by on Jul 7, 2015 in Education

Short Selling in 3D Printing Stocks?

Short interest in 3D Systems Corp. (NYSE: DDD) fell 0.3% to 38.5 million shares. Some 36.5% of the company’s float is short. Days to cover rose to 22. In the two-week short interest period to March 31, the share price fell about 1.5%. The stock’s 52-week range is $26.29 to $69.56, and shares closed at $29.79 on Friday. 3D Systems is scheduled to release its earnings on April 27. Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS) saw short interest decline 4.8% in the final two weeks of March to about 10 million shares, or about 22.3% of the company’s float. Days to cover remained at 10. The share price fell about 11.2% in the two-week period. The stock closed most recently at $57.06, and the 52-week range is $51.50 to $130.83. Short interest in The ExOne Co. (NASDAQ: XONE) fell 1.5% to 3.52 million shares. About 39% of the company’s shares are now short. Shares of ExOne fell about 5.7% in the two-week period. The stock’s 52-week range is $13.19 to $48.66, and shares closed at $15.72 on Friday. Days to cover rose to 12. Voxeljet A.G. (NYSE: VJET) saw short interest fall 4.2% to 1.99 million shares, with days to cover falling to 11. The share price fell about 5.7% in the two-week period to March 31. The stock ended last week at $9.15, in a 52-week range of $7.13 to...

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3D Printing Investments – Carbon 3D Prints Up A $10 Million Deal With Autodesk

Posted by on Apr 9, 2015 in 3D Imaging, 3D Modeling

3D Printing Investments – Carbon 3D Prints Up A $10 Million Deal With Autodesk

In late 2014, Autodesk launched the Spark Investment Fund with the aim of investing up to $100 million in entrepreneurs, innovators and startups who push the boundaries of 3D printing. The Spark Investment Fund is the first venture fund exclusively dedicated to driving the overall growth of the 3D printing ecosystem. “Carbon3D embodies the innovation that’s required to change how products are made. The incredible speed of its CLIP technology makes 3D printing accessible for true manufacturing, beyond the prototyping and the one-offs we see it being used for now.” William Dante, of the Association of 3D Printing feels that “this new technology will once again be a game changer in the industry.” Current layer-by-layer 3D printing technology is slow and often produces parts that are mechanically weak due to their shale-like layers. Using a tunable photochemical process instead of the traditional mechanical approach, Carbon3D’s CLIP technology eliminates these shortcomings to rapidly transform 3D models into physical objects. By carefully balancing the interaction of UV light, which triggers photo polymerization, and oxygen, which inhibits the reaction, CLIP continuously grows molecularly solid objects from a pool of resin at speeds of up to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing...

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3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2015 in 3D Printers, Business, Education

3D Printing And Money – Are There Ways to 3D Print Money?

Besides getting ahold of the best selling book; How to 3D Print Money (downloadable or on Amazon) Create and sell designs. This is the most affordable and easiest way to get started. It’s essentially like creating a smartphone app and selling it for royalties. * Start by learning from free CAD tools like Trimble Sketchup or TinkerCAD. Most beginners are surprised by how easily they can whip up a complex looking design after a few tutorials. Sophisticated and professional quality designs can be made with these tools. Make sure to leverage the available online tutorials and communities for help. Invent a design. * Leverage the power of 3D printing by creating complex shapes easily, customize designs cheaply, or create moving parts which require no assembly. Need inspiration? Spend time perusing the 40,000+ designs on thingiverse.com to marvel at the creativity and possibilities shared by others. * Once your design is complete in CAD, make sure it’s 3D printable (or “watertight,” in industry jargon). Other free tools like netfabb or the Solid Inspector plugin for Sketchup will find and correct errors you inadvertently created. * Now with your ready-to-print file, you just need to find an outlet to sell it. Sites like CG Trader are pure design marketplaces which allow users to search for 3D printable designs and print them on their own 3D printers. Other sites like Shapeways or i.Materialise allow similar services. Buy a 3D printer and offer a 3D printing service. While the concept is simple, this option is not quite as easy. It will require an investment of hundreds to thousands of dollars to acquire a printer. * The first step is to select a printer that has the right balance of cost, output quality, versatility, and ease of use. * Once you have the printer in your home or office you will need to spend ample time experimenting with it and mastering its intricacies. You will need to understand how variables like layer height, extrusion temperature, and travel speed will impact your print job. You will need to know how to select appropriate feedstock and optimize it based on the material type. Even the software you choose to turn the printable file into machine code (G-code in industry jargon) can influence the output. Many printers come with their own software to do this, but you may get different (perhaps better, in some cases) results with the open source replicator G, for instance. This in itself can be a fun path of discovery. * Once you are confident in your expertise you can enter the fray by offering your services as part of one of the emerging 3D printing networks. These are turnkey solutions with support for invoicing and shipping that allow you to list your printer and accept orders from people with designs they want printed. Currently, the largest such network is 3D Hubs. Come...

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