3D Printing Venture News – Link3D In Boulder Colorado Received Funding

Posted by on Nov 1, 2019 in Manufacturing

3D Printing Venture News – Link3D In Boulder Colorado Received Funding

Link3D will integrate its flagship product with IoT, artificial intelligence, and workflow automation technology to maximize production with capacity management, dynamic scheduling, and predictive QMS solutions. “With this funding round, Link3D will continue to scale and grow operations in North America, Europe, and Japan by expanding our sales and customer support,” said Shane Fox, Co-Founder and CEO of Link3D. “The funding will also aid in our R&D efforts to introduce workflow automation and artificial intelligence within the additive manufacturing production environment. These developments will help organizations around the world unlock the true benefits of industrial manufacturing.” The additive manufacturing markets in North America, Europe, and Japan are expected to grow from $2.4 billion to $7.7 billion, $1.8 billion to $7.2 billion, and $1 billion to $5.6 billion, respectively, over the next five years, according to Frost & Sullivan. Link3D’s Additive MES workflow software can help bolster overall adoption of additive manufacturing, from prototyping to series production, in major industries in these regions, such as aerospace and defense, automotive, consumer, medical, and oil and gas. About Link3D Link3D, headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, offers Additive MES workflow software to help organizations scale their digital manufacturing strategy. Link3D applies modern technologies, such as IoT, workflow automation and machine learning to enable manufacturers to unlock the true benefits of Industry 4.0. Visit Link3D here:...

Read More »

3D Printing Joint Ventures Abound

Posted by on Feb 19, 2019 in 3D Printers, Investing

3D Printing Joint Ventures Abound

Australian metal 3D printer manufacturer, Aurora Labs, has entered a joint venture with WorleyParsons Services, a Sydney-based engineering and consulting company. The 50/50 shared venture will bring Aurora Labs and Advision Digital, a software and data science expert owned by WorleyParsons, to form AdditiveNow. AdditiveNow will provide an additive manufacturing service package to clients in the oil & gas and mining industry. Aurora Labs’ Managing Director, David Budge, said, “The finalization of this joint venture is a significant step forward for Aurora Labs and for the 3D printing industry as a whole […] We look forward to helping our new broader network of customers to find business advantage through 3D printing solutions, especially across the mining, oil & gas and major infrastructure sectors.” Aurora Labs is known for the S-Titanium Pro and Alpha 3D printer. The S-Titanium Pro in particular is significantly cheaper than most industrial metal 3D printers and also has an open source approach to materials. These were cited as primary reasons for the sales boost Aurora Labs received in the Q1 FY2019. Aurora Labs has been in partnership with WorleyParsons since 2017, but now bringing Advision Digital onboard, Aurora Labs will provide AM services to its client and build digital...

Read More »

3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

Posted by on Dec 19, 2018 in Uncategorized

3D Printing Joint Ventures Needed For Many Suppliers

That scenario has changed in the past few years, particularly with the avalanche of inexpensive but highly capable desktop 3D printers emerging from manufacturers such as LulzBot, Prusa, AirWolf 3D, Raise 3D and many others. Some vendors have also pursued – and achieved – the development of higher temperature 3D printers.  These machines were not only widely used, but are also capable of 3D printing in a much wider range of materials.  But where are these materials coming from?  The traditional approach of simply using materials from existing product catalogs has continued, but sometimes it’s discovered that a particular material may not provide the best 3D printing performance or quality, in spite of the material’s otherwise excellent and desirable engineering properties.  What to do?  The answer is to tune both the materials and the target 3D printer to print the material more optimally.  But there’s a problem: while the 3D printer manufacturers are perfectly capable of tuning their device, they may not have the appropriate chemical knowledge and facilities to tune the materials.  By the same logic, a materials company can tune the chemistry, but is less able to tune the machine that material is targeted to print on.  Thus the need for partnerships: materials companies should reach out to 3D printer manufacturers and vice versa to create joint ventures intended to develop new materials that will be highly successful.  One great example of such a partnership is the work undertaken by E3D Online, makers of what seems to be  current industry standard hot ends and extruders, and Victrex. These UK-based operations teamed up to develop a new “printable” PAEK polymer. They explain the problem:  read the full article...

Read More »